Back in Belgrade Serbia – Photography from The Mean Streets – Volume 2

Belgrade street photography

B elgrade is the capital city of Serbia and largest city in the Balkans. It’s also a city where I feel incredibly comfortable.  Whether it’s the leafy streets of “old” Belgrade – epitomised by the inner city area of Dorcol, or the wide boulevards of Novi Beograd – including the endless sets of communist-era concrete apartment blocks. It’s a truly wonderful city. For the second time this year, I found myself in Belgrade. And, it won’t be the last time.

This is not a regular Yomadic post. No heavy stories, no communist architecture, just a group of photos all taken in the last week or so on the streets of Belgrade. I know people enjoyed seeing the streets of Belgrade last time around, and, if I don’t put these photos up now, they’ll be lost to the ages. So no story today – just photos.

Personal travel update – yesterday I left  Belgrade, and I find myself tonight in Varna – the second biggest city in Bulgaria. It was a long drive – about a thousand kilometres from Belgrade, to the edge of the Black Sea. I only have seven days here in Bulgaria, I’m going to check out a few things I’ve been looking forward to, and then I need to be back in Belgrade – for a very good reason, as you will see soon.

But for now, the mean streets of Belgrade.

A city that isn’t on the radar of many travellers, but I think it should be.

Wherever you are, have a great weekend.

Nate

PS, normal posting will resume next week – live from Bulgaria.

Street portrait, Belgrade, Serbia.
Street portrait, Belgrade, Serbia.
Lady on the streets of Dorcol, Belgrade.
Lady on the streets of Dorcol, Belgrade.
Belgrade, Serbia.
Belgrade, Serbia.
Belgrade market stall man.
It took a lot of convincing to get this guy to allow me to take his photo. Totally worth it. Belgrade, Serbia.
Leafy streets of Dorcol, Belgrade.
Typical Dorcol street. It’s a beautiful part of Belgrade.
A real Zebra crossing in Dorcol, inner city Belgrade.
A real Zebra crossing in Dorcol, inner city Belgrade.
A waiter in Belgrade, Serbia.
Belgrade, Serbia.
Belgrade Butcher
If anyone knows why this hand gesture is performed by Serbian’s everywhere, please let me know.
Underground Belgrade, Serbia.
Underground Belgrade, Serbia.
Belgrade, Serbia.
Belgrade, Serbia.
Belgrade underground train station.
Belgrade underground train station.
Bow ties and waiters. Common sights in Belgrade, Serbia.
Bow ties and waiters. Common sights in Belgrade, Serbia.
Mean streets of Beograd, Serbia.
Mean streets of Beograd, Serbia.
View over Belgrade, from the top floor of the East Gate apartment
View over Belgrade, from the top floor of the East Gate apartments. Belgrade, I’ll be back soon.
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24 thoughts on “Back in Belgrade Serbia – Photography from The Mean Streets – Volume 2

  1. The hand gesture means “see 3 fingers. Anything Asians can do we can do better. Serbia is number 1″… Perhaps.

    1. yup, Nina’s version is more accurate that the Wikipedia link, I think now, people use if just for fun, I know I do only when I’m watching sports

  2. Nate,

    Is this still with the xpro-1 or are you on to a x100s? You are bangin in the image dept. just bangin! More or at least create a flickr link gallery.

    Be well

    Laurence

        1. Got one in the first batch delivered in the US. After decades of using DSLRs for newspaper work, this thing is a true joy to use. I carry it or my X-E1 w/35mm (sometimes BOTH!) everywhere! Entering retirement, the Fuji X-System has brought joy & passion back to my photographic adventure!!!

  3. The serbian 3 fingers means “the Father, Son and the Holy Spirit”….wich in old times was gestured with the 3 fingers together ( touching eachother) and after forming Yugoslavia it became in use the actual version wich was actually the croatian custom.
    Nowdays serbians who are studing theeir history and heritage are going back to the original way of representing their believe and faith, the three fingers together as one, same as our Holy trinity represents the 3 diferent natures of 1 God.
    Long live Serbia and his people

    1. Three fingers is related with Serbian orthodox religion. They cross themselves with three fingers, when baby is born they cross him with three fingers. Serbians relatives kiss three times when they meet after longer time. Womans almost every time.

  4. The three finger salute became extra popular during the Kosovar Wars when America was fighting the Serbs so Kosovo could claim independence. Serbs are predominately Orthodox, Kosovo Muslim. The Kosovars would hold a “V” for victory, Serbs the three fingers for the Trinity, denoting their opposition to islam and their faith to their church.

  5. I’m glad that you saw in Serbia some other things then strange stories that are served on west. Hope that you will come again, and if do i would be more then happy to show you Belgrade by local eyes. tw: @ncerovac

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